Ajam Podcast #1: Welcome to the Ajamily

Episode 1 September 26, 2018 00:38:24
Ajam Podcast #1: Welcome to the Ajamily
Ajam Media Collective Podcast
Ajam Podcast #1: Welcome to the Ajamily
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Show Notes

Thanks to our amazing supporters of our recent crowdfund, Ajam will now be producing and releasing podcasts. We expect a wide variety of formats, but we wanted to use our first episode as a chance to update our listeners and introduce our new series. Remember to visit us at ajammc.com to learn more or contact us! Check out the article from Nir Shafir that we discussed: https://aeon.co/essays/why-fake-miniatures-depicting-islamic-science-are-everywhere

Episode Transcript

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