Ajam Podcast #12: The Rise & Fall of Khoqand

Episode 12 April 08, 2019 00:36:15
Ajam Podcast #12: The Rise & Fall of Khoqand
Ajam Media Collective Podcast
Ajam Podcast #12: The Rise & Fall of Khoqand
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Show Notes

Central Asianists rejoice! In this episode, Rustin speaks with Scott Levi, Professor and Chair of History at Ohio State University. He is the author of [The Rise and Fall of Khoqand, 1709-1876: Central Asia in the Global Age (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017)](https://www.upress.pitt.edu/books/9780822965060/) Dr. Levi gives an overview of the history of the Khoqand Khanate, a dynastic polity centered around the Ferghana Valley in the heart of Central Asia. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Uzbek Ming rulers extended their rule across and beyond the fertile valley, establishing important political and economic linkages with Imperial China, Russia, and the Indian Subcontinent. Throughout the discussion, Dr. Levi stresses the importance of "connected history" and highlights how globalizing forces, environmental changes, and demographic shifts brought about the rise and fall of the Khoqand Khanate. Rustin closes out the episode with one of his favorite Soviet-era Uzbek songs, [Bugmacha Bilagim by Rano Sabirova (1979)](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awdWWNpqGio)

Episode Transcript

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