Ajam Podcast #18: Of Gardens and Graves in Kashmir

Episode 18 November 03, 2019 00:40:26
Ajam Podcast #18: Of Gardens and Graves in Kashmir
Ajam Media Collective Podcast
Ajam Podcast #18: Of Gardens and Graves in Kashmir
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Show Notes

In this episode, Teren Sevea, an Assistant Professor of South Asian Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, interviews Suvir Kaul, the A. M. Rosenthal Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Kaul is the the author of the book: [Of Gardens and Graves: Essays on Kashmir](https://www.english.upenn.edu/publications/2015/suvir-kaul/gardens-and-graves), published by Duke University Press in 2017. Dr. Sevea and Dr. Kaul open the episode with a discussion about the political history of Kashmir's division and occupation, as well as how India's BJP-majority government has recently revoked Jammu and Kashmir's special status, dramatically affecting the everyday lives of people in the region. They then explore the role of Kashmiri poetry as a medium for understanding the decades-long occupation, as well as the resistance to it. Finally, the episode closes with a reading of "A Pastoral," a poem written by the late Srinagar-born poet Agha Shahid 'Ali (1949-2001) in dedication to Dr. Kaul.

Episode Transcript

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