Ajam Podcast #19: A Cinematic History of Iranian Cosmopolitanism

Episode 19 July 19, 2020 00:30:38
Ajam Podcast #19: A Cinematic History of Iranian Cosmopolitanism
Ajam Media Collective Podcast
Ajam Podcast #19: A Cinematic History of Iranian Cosmopolitanism
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Show Notes

In this episode, Rustin interviews Golbarg Rekabtalaei, an Assistant Professor of History at Seton Hall University. She is the author of [Iranian Cosmopolitanism: A Cinematic History](https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/iranian-cosmopolitanism/729C8936B157EC6DA38BE4), published by Cambridge University Press in 2019. Dr. Rekabtalaei traces how the diverse ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds of cinematographers, cinema owners, and cinema goers shaped Iran's urban culture and its citizenry's understanding of modernity. The interview opens with a discussion of the first films produced in Iran: what they looked like, where they were shown, and who was watching them. Then, Dr. Rekabtalaei explains how this cosmopolitanism fed into Iranian national identity and notions of sovereignty in the 1920s and 1930s. The conversation ends with the emergence of both popular cinema (derogatorily labelled "Film Farsi") and alternative cinema (*sinema-ye motevavet*) in the 1950s and 60s. Episode No. 19 Release Date: 20 July 2020 Recording Location: New York City, NY. Produced by Rustin Zarkar and Ali Karjoo-Ravary Audio editing: Nicholas Gunty Music: Yavaran (Intro: "404 day in heaven" Outro: "Har Chi")

Episode Transcript

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